5 Reasons Why Robotics Classes are Beneficial

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STEM in education is essential in preparing and equipping students for our innovative world. It can be challenging for teachers to find ways to teach students the STEM skills needed to prepare them for the future job market, while also keeping it fun and engaging. Robotics is a valuable way to introduce students to STEM fields. Here are five reasons why Robotics classes are so beneficial.

1 – Robotics teaches essential teamwork and collaboration skills.

Although not all students in a robotics class will go on to work in science or math related fields, the teamwork and collaboration skills they learn will be used throughout their life. As students work on a robotics project, they quickly learn that if they don’t know how to collaborate with others and communicate their ideas they will not succeed. Students will learn how to express their ideas, listen, and relate to their classmate.

Being around like-minded peers is also beneficial and provides an opportunity for students to make friends and grow in their skills together.

2 – Robotics is an educational launching pad.

Robotics is, in many ways, an all-in-one STEM learning experience. Students learn coding, mathematical skills, and science. Students are given the opportunity to “step into the shoes” of an engineer, and practice how science can solve real world problems. Robotics classes also give students the opportunity to explore multiple learning pathways and may develop passions for subjects they were unfamiliar with before such as 3D printing.

Getting Smart notes that, “robotics offers them an open platform where they can decide where to go with their experimentations. For teachers, a robotics curriculum naturally allows us to take an individualized approach to each student’s learning, helping to nurture their passions even further.”

3 – Robotics can lead to positive community involvement.

The community created within a robotics classroom has great potential to expand outside of the classroom. Students can have opportunities to present robotic creations and projects at local events such as museums or technology fairs. This challenges students to take pride in their creation and the teamwork that made it happen. Students are also shown that projects created in school can be more than just a grade, but also a tool to inspire. The intimidation of robotics shifts to students feeling confident in their skills and potentially sparking an interest in STEM

4 – Robotics creates leaders.

Robotics classes provide an opportunity for multiple student strengths to shine. Students with strong speaking skills can verbally bring ideas to life. Other students may not be strong vocally but are skilled in technical tasks or keeping the team on task. Robotics projects allow both of these students with different leadership capabilities to communicate as a team and work together. The ability to come together and embrace differences while still communicating and utilizing personal strength, is a life skill that many adults are still learning!

5 – Robotics teaches life and career skills.

Students who are interested in STEM will find that Robotics is a great way to concretely learn those skills. Robotics projects can inspire students to envision a future in a STEM profession. ID Tech notes, “the perseverance it takes to patiently and meticulously assemble a piece of hardware or the problem-solving necessary to program a robot to complete an obstacle course. These skills are essential not only in the STEM world, but in the working world as a whole.”

Sources:

https://www.idtech.com/blog/educational-benefits-robotics

https://www.gettingsmart.com/2016/11/08/unexpected-benefits-robotics-in-the-classroom/

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