Tips for Starting a STEAM Program

littleBits

Schools across the country are getting involved in the STEAM movement by integrating innovative programs and spaces that inspire a new generation of designers and inventors. Help your customers bring STEAM to their school with these tips from littleBits.

  1. Districts and schools need to have a clear vision of what their STEAM goals are. Everyone involved in launching the STEAM program must agree on what to accomplish.
  2. STEAM programs can be expensive. Here are some ideas to consider when looking for funding.
    • Start a campaign on DonorsChoose.org
    • Apply for local, state, and national grants
    • Look for sponsorships from local businesses and organizations
    • Offer after-schools STEAM classes and use the fees to pay for STEAM programs
  3. Equip teachers with training needed to understand concepts.
  4. Encourage schools to allow time for teachers to tinker and collaborate.
  5. Encourage schools to find maker-type teachers to inspire the whole team. These teachers should be involved in the planning process as they will share their enthusiasm and ideas with others.
  6. Schools should bring in parents and community members with engineering, architectural, scientific, entrepreneurship, and art backgrounds to help give them a better understanding of STEAM.
  7. Teachers need to encourage students to keep trying if their project isn’t successful so they can build and strengthen their abilities.
  8. Teachers should build STEAM projects around real-life problems as these projects will be more interesting for the students.
  9. Make the space welcoming so students want to come in.
  10. Schools and districts should hold fairs so students can exhibit their inventions.
  11. Encourage teachers to keep the disruptive nature of the STEAM movement as this can bring a positive energy. Every student’s project should look different.
Soure: EdWeek and littleBits

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